St. George’s Day and a lesson from the French?

Last year I wrote this post relating to the patron saint of England, St. George. One year on and as Britain is stumbling forward through its self-inflicted exit from the European Union, I see little change in the mood of Little Britain, at least from what I read in the media.

Today, on the “other side of the channel” as we tend to call it, we saw the potential for a change in Europe as Emmanuel Macron finally gave Marine Le Pen a good run for her money and established that the center left candidate may actually stand a chance to win in a two-horse race for the Presidency for La Republique. Perhaps we will see a tide change and just maybe this will have a knock-on effect on the results of the snap election that Prime Minister Theresa May has called back in the UK. After all it may not be so much about St. George killing the dragon anymore but rather that the slumbering dragon, in the form of the disenfranchised populace who weren’t motivated to cast their democratic vote last time, will actually see that their opinions do count and turn up at the polling stations to make their mark.

Perhaps it is time for the dragon to roar…

170423_StGeorge.jpg
~Richard

St George’s Day, and the 400th anniversary of the Bard’s death

I note that today is St George’s Day (the Patron Saint of England) and also the 400th anniversary of the death of arguably the most significant writer in the English language, William Shakespeare. It was the great bard who penned the famous cry to this saint in the Battle of Agincourt speech in his play Henry V:  “Follow your spirit, and upon this charge Cry ‘God for Harry, England, and Saint George!'”

St. George was a Roman soldier who was killed for not recanting his Christian faith. Somewhere along this line a myth grew up around him that he killed a dragon and this is how we generally know him in the UK, and how he is almost exclusively portrayed.

Now, fast forward to 2016 and where many jingoistic groups have relatively recently sprung up in the UK, to support those smouldering hate-filled organizations  who have been around since the early 20th century, and all of whom hide behind a falsehood of National Pride. These groups often associate themselves with the St. George Cross and use terms such as Keep Britain British and other meaningless rhetoric.

How ironic that a Christian Roman soldier, with no known association to England should be used to support the vitriolic hate speech and scare mongering that has been spread throughout the nation regarding immigration and has, to a large extent, driven the country to consider leaving the European Union based on such rhetoric rather than simple facts.

I wonder what the bard would have made of this?

160423_StGeorgesDay
St. George by Raphael

~Richard

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

From 1 Blogger 2 Another

Sharing Great Blog Posts

Journeys Through Pre-World War 3 Britain

Travelling the overcast isles

cancer killing recipe

Just another WordPress.com site

the poet's billow

a resource for moving poetry

Sara in LaLaLand

Welcome to my world.

Rustic Rumination

Mind over matter

Stephen Liddell

Musings on a mad world

thisisyouth

Travel. Climbing. Characters. True stories, well told.

GlobeTrotters: When Pig's Fly

Travel, Fitness, Northern. Three of the finer things in life! Join me in exploring the globe and telling a funny story along the way with a little piggy

Fictionspawn Monsters

Illustrated Short Stories

RPR Consulting, Inc

Success By Design

Back to Blighty

A returning expat's perspective of Britain

Sauce Box

Never get lost in the Sauce

Jim Kayalar Photography

Photo Book Store

DADDY'S CUISINE

Happy Eating

in cahoots with muddy boots

Cooking, gardening, traveling and photographing around the globe

P e d r o L

storytelling the world

%d bloggers like this: